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  #1  
Old 07-11-2018, 05:40 PM
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Default Papa John's founder grovels for using N-word on conference call

https://money.cnn.com/2018/07/11/new...ter/index.html

Papa John's founder apologizes for using N-word on conference call
July 11, 2018: 5:28 PM ET



John Schnatter, the founder and public face of Papa John's pizza, apologized Wednesday for using the N-word on a conference call in May.

Forbes reported earlier that he used the racial slur while participating in a role-playing exercise designed to prevent public relations crises.

In a statement issued through the company, Schnatter said: "News reports attributing the use of inappropriate and hurtful language to me during a media training session regarding race are true. Regardless of the context, I apologize. Simply stated, racism has no place in our society."

According to the account in Forbes, Schnatter was on a call with Laundry Service, a marketing agency, and was asked how he planned to manage future public relations flare-ups.

Schnatter caused controversy last year when he said that Papa John's pizza sales were hurt by the NFL's handling of players' kneeling during the National Anthem in protest of racial injustice. He stepped down as CEO two months after the comments. He remains chairman of the boar

On the call, Schnatter sought to downplay the significance of his criticism of the league and its players, Forbes reported.

"Colonel Sanders called blacks n-----s," he said, complaining that Sanders had never received backlash, according to Forbes. The parent company of KFC did not immediately answer a request for comment.

Forbes also reported that Schnatter recalled growing up in Indiana, where he said people used to drag black people from their trucks until they died.

Forbes reported that Schnatter's comments were intended to demonstrate his stance against racism, but that people on the call were offended by them.

Laundry Service, which is owned by Wasserman Media Group, declined to comment through a spokesperson on Schnatter's remarks or the company's relationship with Papa John's. Forbes reported that Wasserman moved to end its contract with Papa John's after the call.

Schnatter also resigned Wednesday from the University of Louisville board of trustees. The chairman, J. David Grissom, said: "After speaking with John, I'm confident that his comments, while inappropriate, do not reflect his personal beliefs or values." He added that the members of the board don't condone racism or "insensitive" language.
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2018, 12:33 PM
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Default Re: Papa John's founder grovels for using N-word on conference call

https://nypost.com/2018/07/13/papa-j...nference-call/

Papa John says he was ‘pressured’ to use n-word during conference call
By Carl Stier
July 13, 2018 | 10:19pm | Updated

Embattled pizza chain Papa John’s on Friday moved to erase the memory of founder John Schnatter — literally.

The chain, with 5,212 locations, said it would remove the 56-year-old executive’s likeness from its logo, promotional materials and other marketing efforts , days after he drew heat for using the N-word during an inter-company conference call.

In addition, Major League Baseball has discontinued its Papa Slam promotion with the Louisville, Ky.-based company, and at least 12 MLB teams — including the Yankees and Mets by Friday — dropped local sponsorships.

Also on Friday, the University of Louisville said it would remove Schnatter’s name from its football stadium.

The blowback from the remarks seems to have troubled investors. Papa John’s shares dipped 12 cents on Friday, to $53.55, after rising sharply one day earlier when Schnatter stepped down as chairman of the company.

“In response to the reprehensible remarks made by Papa John’s founder and owner, the New York Yankees are suspending their relationship with the company,” the franchise said in a prepared statement.

Said the Mets, “The highly offensive comments by the founder of Papa John’s are completely inconsistent with our values. We immediately suspended promotional activities with the sponsor prior to our game Wednesday night.”

The 34-year-old pizza chain plans to hire an independent expert to audit all the company’s processes, policies and systems related to diversity and inclusion, Chief Executive Steve Ritchie said in a statement.

Ritchie stressed that the chain, with 120,00 employees and franchise “team members,” is more than just Schnatter.

PC coward Eric Schiffer, who works with Fortune 500 companies and CEOs on overcoming crises, told The Post that the company is making the right move in distancing itself from the executive.

“They need to take John Schnatter, and put him in the SpaceX rocket and send him to Mars,” Schiffer said. “His face is radioactive; it’s the kiss of death.”

On Friday afternoon, Schnatter, in an interview on WHAS, a Louisville radio station, said he was pressured to use the N-word during the conference call.

“The agency was promoting that vocabulary … They pushed me. And it upset me,” he told host Terry Meiners.

“It’s caused a lot of grief for my community, for my university,” Schnatter noted. “My employees are distraught, they’re crushed, and it’s all because I was sloppy and I wasn’t as sensitive. It’s the same mistake I made on the NFL comments.”

The executive caught flak in January when he said Papa John’s, a longtime NFL sponsor, saw its sales get dinged because of the league’s players’ national anthem kneeling protest.

Those comments led to him stepping down as CEO — and the NFL cutting ties to the chain.

Sunny Bonnell, chief executive of branding agency Motto, said that after some “knee-jerk” reactions by the chain and rebranding, things should settle down.

Despite the damage and Schnatter’s toxic state, Schiffer believes the turmoil will blow over and the chain will be OK.

“No one is going to care about this in a month,” he said.
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Old 07-14-2018, 07:04 PM
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Default Re: Papa John's founder grovels for using N-word on conference call

Incredible what they are doing to this white man... GD niggers call each other nigger all day long.. this guy is literally having his life destroyed for saying nigger!! It's insane what they are doing to him. Thanks jews!!! Oh yeah, I almost forgot: NIGGER!!!!!!! Just gotta say, I love saying nigger!!!! Hell yeah!!!

NIGGER!!!
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http://books.google.com/books/pdf/Th...DslJfXg31opb2A 1867 Presentation on the Negro before the PC takeover
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http://anglo-saxonisrael.com/
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Old 10-29-2019, 03:22 PM
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Default Re: Papa John's founder grovels for using N-word on conference call

https://nypost.com/2019/10/29/papa-j...-aint-as-good/

‘Papa’ John dishes on n-word ouster: Without me, the pizza ain’t as good
By John H. Schnatter
October 29, 2019 | 4:26pm | Updated

“Papa John” Schnatter founded his namesake company in 1984, and built it into the nation’s third-largest pizza chain. But after he criticized the NFL’s inability to resolve the anthem protests, he was pushed out as CEO on Jan. 1, 2018. In a column submission to The Post, Schnatter argues that in the time since, his business — of which he still owns 16.7% — has been poorly run, and that it was a mistake to let him go.

As the founder and single largest shareholder of Papa John’s Pizza, I know a thing or two about management accountability. It was two years ago that I led my last quarterly earnings call for Wall Street analysts as the chairman and CEO.

Our sales at the time were slowing considerably, largely owing to the NFL’s mishandling of the protest controversy. A quarter of our marketing budget was invested in the NFL each year; as NFL viewership declined, so did customers’ exposure to our marketing.

More controversy ensued months later, when an internal diversity-training meeting was secretly taped and leaked to Forbes with a false narrative about a comment I made. In the meeting, I expressed frustration over the NFL controversy and paraphrased someone who had purportedly used the n-word on a frequent basis.

In fact, I was expressing my disdain for racism throughout the meeting , which was quite productive and demonstrated Papa John’s commitment to a diverse, positive and enriching environment. For decades, we’ve brought people of all backgrounds together for their mutual benefit, spreading tremendous success to employees, franchisees, partners and shareholders alike.

Ironically, Gov. Andrew Cuomo used a racial comment during a live radio interview last week, and African American state leaders rushed to defend him, showing their understanding of the intent and context of his words while also considering his character.

Cuomo’s situation is in stark contrast to the irrational overreaction and internal exploitation of my comments. The double standard is jarring. I would have hoped to have been given the benefit of the doubt, just as Cuomo was. Instead, unnamed sources reversed the meaning and intent of my words to damage me.

This has left the franchisees and the company to struggle without my leadership and brand expertise ever since.

I have a huge stake in Papa John’s, not just financially, but also with 35 years of my blood, sweat and tears. In August 2018, I tried warning my fellow directors and put out a news release that the performance of the company was bound to get worse. My prediction has been proved right for four quarters since then and still today.

This year, I opposed management’s budget proposal, because I recognized that, among other things, no one on the board and very few in executive leadership had any experience in the pizza industry. They couldn’t possibly understand the steps necessary to correct this very complicated, struggling business as I had on a number of occasions in the past. One such comeback led to the growth of our stock price from more than $87 per share in 2017, up from $6.50 per share in 2008.

More important, what I’ve observed in the months since then is that the Papa John’s management may be emphasizing cost-cutting over product quality. Even the pizzas don’t appear to be made the way that I made them just a few years ago.

“Better Ingredients. Better Pizza.” isn’t just a slogan — it represents our core belief about the quality of our products, starting with the signature ingredients in my original recipes, including fresh packed proprietary pizza sauce, original fresh dough and garlic butter.

I hear from store managers, franchisees and employees, and I believe that their morale is at an all-time low. Some are taking out additional loans and putting off future plans as they tighten their belts based on the current performance of the company. Franchisees tell me that banks are even hesitant to lend them money to buy and build more stores. This troubles me deeply.

Based on my experience, recent declines in store economics make it extremely difficult to increase earnings per share for shareholders, now or in the immediate future.

Leadership means taking responsibility for the command of your ship and not using scapegoats. This management team needs to step up and change course — immediately — to revive our iconic American brand. I should know, since my team and I built more than 5,000 stores from scratch and brought us through other down cycles.

I’m watching carefully and hoping for good news — but a lot rides on the upcoming report for this company Nov. 5. At stake are the interests of thousands of people I consider my family, whose livelihoods depend entirely on the success of the current team to return our company to greatness.
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If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
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