NNN Reporters Newsroom Forum  

Go Back   NNN Reporters Newsroom Forum > RSS FEED

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-21-2016, 05:25 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/21/de-blas...2k-since-2014/

De Blasio’s lobbyist pal has collected $862K since 2014
By Rich Calder
January 21, 2016 | 1:49am


Harold Ickes and Bill de Blasio
Photo: Reuters; WireImage


A longtime pal of Mayor de Blasio has collected $862,550 as a lobbyist for 14 clients since the mayor took office in 2014 – compared to $61,305 off a single client the previous 12 years, according to city records.

Harold Ickes – a mentor of the mayor and former Clinton administration official – operated out of Washington DC and didn’t even have a New York office until after de Blasio ascended to power.

Since then, Ickes has lined up some blue chip clients seeking city assistance.

They include the American Beverage Association, which has shelled out $180,000 trying to limit Health Department restrictions on sugary drinks; JP MorganChase, which paid $172,500 for what wound up being a failed bid to win subsidies to build new headquarters on the Far West Side; AEG Live, which shelled out $150,000 before scoring a permit to host a major music festival on Randall’s Island; and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1181-1061, which spent $42,000 before Ickes delivered $42 million in taxpayer funds to boost private bus driver salaries.

AEG got its permit for the music festival Jan. 11 – the same day Ickes bundled $13,000 in donations for de Blasio’s re-election campaign.

In comparison, Ickes’ only client with city business during the 12 years of the former Bloomberg administration was the International Dairy Foods Association, which paid him $61,305 in 2007.

When asked about Ickes’ influence at City Hall, mayoral spokesman Peter Kardushin said, “Every day, individuals lobby New York City on a broad range of issues. All decisions by the de Blasio administration are made on the merits.”

Records show Ickes also enjoyed face-time with de Blasio.

He and business partner Janice Enright met with the mayor and First Lady Chirlane McCray over dinner for 90 minutes at Gracie Mansion in November 2014 to discuss JP Morgan; and Ickes met with de Blasio at City Hall for a half hour in August 2014 to discuss the bus-driver union’s salaries.
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-21-2016, 05:29 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/21/new-yor...g-of-homeless/

New Yorkers are fed up with De Blasio’s handling of homeless
By Michael Gartland
January 21, 2016 | 1:22am

New Yorkers aren’t convinced Mayor de Blasio is doing enough to tackle homelessness, with 73 percent saying the city should do more, according to a poll released Wednesday.

Just 19 percent said the administration’s handling of the issue was “about right.”

The Quinnipiac University survey also found that only 38 percent of voters rated the city’s quality of life as “good or very good,” while 42 percent rated it “fair” and 19 percent gave it the lowest grades of “poor” or “very poor.”

“New Yorkers are seeing more homeless people on the street and they don’t like it. They say the quality of life is not so good and that it’s getting worse,” said pollster Maurice Carroll.

The findings come a month after de Blasio rolled out a new initiative to quickly respond to people living on the streets.

De Blasio spokeswoman Ishanee Parikh said:

“We’ve made unprecedented commitments to ensure New York City has the most comprehensive program to prevent and reduce homelessness.”
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-21-2016, 05:32 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/21/city-co...life-offenses/

City Council wants to decriminalize quality-of-life offenses
By Yoav Gonen, Michael Gartland and Bob Fredericks
January 21, 2016 | 1:15am

The City Council on Monday will introduce a set of bills calling for civil summonses for nonviolent quality-of-life offenses, such as public urination and drinking, but cops would still decide whether to make an arrest.

The plan to decriminalize the offenses — which also include littering, breaking park rules, making excessive noise and failing to appear in court — and lessen penalties for scofflaws are included in eight bills, collectively dubbed “The Criminal Justice Reform Act of 2016,” that are up for a public hearing Monday.

Commie spic Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito said the reforms were the result of months of discussions with Mayor de Blasio’s office and the NYPD.

“The Criminal Justice Reform Act of 2016 is a bold step towards reforming a system which for too long has disproportionately punished low-level, nonviolent offenses,” she said in a statement.

The act would let people issued civil summonses for the offenses avoid Criminal Court and have their cases heard by the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, which could issue fines or require community service.
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-22-2016, 08:07 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/22/city-ho...mination-unit/

City housing homeless in hospital’s decontamination unit
By Michael Gartland
January 22, 2016 | 3:28am


The makeshift homeless shelter behind Elmhurst Hospital. Photo: Ellis Kaplan


The city is so desperate to find space for the burgeoning homeless population that it’s housing downtrodden New Yorkers in a decontamination unit at a city hospital, The Post has learned.

The unit, located in a trailer at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, can hold 35, but it is so cramped that people who seek refuge are forced to sleep in chairs.

Critics slammed the city’s repurposing of the trailer, charging it isn’t fair to either patients or the homeless.

“They’re sleeping there in chairs — no beds,” said Teamsters Local 237 President Gregory Floyd, whose members work as safety officers in the city-run hospital.

“The decontamination unit is not a place for homeless people to sleep. It’s for emergencies.

“If there’s an emergency and they need that chamber, [the hospital] can’t use it because there are homeless people in there,” he added.

According to an internal memo obtained by The Post, the city directed the hospital “to assist in helping homeless persons by providing shelter,” and laid out a list of ground rules.

“No person occupying the trailer may sleep on the floor. All persons MUST sit on a chair,” the Jan. 14 memo says.

“When a homeless person enters, hospital police will issue a blanket, a personal care kit containing a toothbrush, toothpaste and comb.”

One safety officer said the shelter has “been open for a few days.”

The memo, from hospital police Lt. Victor Ashe to lower-ranking safety officers, also instructs that anyone who’s intoxicated be removed from the shelter to the main hospital for treatment.

One homeless man hanging around the fetid shelter Thursday said he won’t stay overnight because people inside are “aggressive.”

Mayoral spokeswoman Ishanee Parikh said, “Our hospitals never turn down anyone seeking to escape the cold. Anyone refusing shelter is always offered the option of a hospital.

“First and foremost, though, we want to get them out of the cold.”

The decontamination unit has been used to house walk-ins for four years, she added.

Floyd shot back that the length of time doesn’t justify its use. “Just because something’s been going on a long time doesn’t make it right,” he said. “That’s not a solution.”
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-23-2016, 07:24 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/22/council...e-blasio-plan/

Council stalls on horse carriage vote over lack of details in de Blasio plan
By Yoav Gonen
January 22, 2016 | 11:44pm

Mayor de Blasio’s bid to rush through a plan to get horse carriages off the streets and into new stables in Central Park ran into a roadblock Friday when mayoral aides couldn’t offer basic details at a City Council hearing.

To the ire of legislators, officials were unable to say how much the proposed stables would cost, what part of the park they’ll be in or how many drivers would lose their jobs.

“The administration did a piss-poor job here today of explaining their case and defending this legislation,” said council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Queens).

“I have to say I came in with a very open mind,” he added. “But I am more angry than ever because it is wrong to ask council members to take a vote like this when no information is known, too many questions unanswered and all this based on a premise that’s not backed.”

As a candidate for mayor, de Blasio vowed to ban the horse-carriage industry from the park on his first day at City Hall — a move that earned him significant financial support from animal-rights groups.

But the issue hasn’t gone away because council members balked at putting down a beloved industry and slashing hundreds of jobs.

Earlier this week, Hizzoner announced a compromise to gradually reduce the number of horses from 180 to 95, stable them in Central Park by October 2018 and — unexpectedly — to restrict pedicabs to north of 85th Street.

While the mayor hoped to get the issue off his plate quickly with a council vote on Feb. 3, one member told The Post the administration’s lack of answers could delay or even derail the vote.

Other members questioned City Hall’s claim that its interests stem from safety, pointing to only 15 horse accidents since 2009.

“I don’t understand the urgency of making such an enormous decision that impacts and upends not one industry, but two, without having this fundamental data,” said Councilman Rory Lancman (D-Queens).

City officials wouldn’t confirm reports that they’re looking to renovate a Parks Department building at 86th Street at an estimated cost of $25 million.
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-24-2016, 06:41 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/24/de-blas...last-25-years/

De Blasio is undoing all the quality of life gains of the last 25 years
By Bob McManus
January 24, 2016 | 6:00am

In Bill de Blasio’s New York, chaos comes in on little cat feet.

Fresh from dropping a fresh dose of bad behavior on the city’s schools, City Hall now seems hell-bent to turn the streets into disorderly premises of the sort not seen since David Dinkins lived in Gracie Mansion.

But not to worry: It’s all happening in the name of racial justice, so that makes it A-OK — even if minorities stand to be the biggest losers.

To be sure, the bad times won’t be back overnight; transformation takes time. But maybe not too long, as it turns out.

In only two-plus years, Team de Blasio returned much of the school system to a state of rudderless pandemonium — where one kid can do a crime knowing some other kid will do the time.

That is, bad actors of all sorts now earn only a stern tut-tut — suspensions largely are out — as violent crime has skyrocketed and classrooms and corridors in many schools have become so chaotic that serious scholarship is all but impossible.

“Our schools are learning places. They’re not suspension places,” Schools Chancellor Carmen Farińa said shortly after assuming office in 2014. “There’s a lot to be said about respecting adults, but good leaders understand clearly that part of respect does venture down.”

Not so much, actually.

Disciplinary suspensions dropped by 16% between the 2013-14 school year and last June; unsurprisingly, Albany reports that forcible sex offenses in city schools were up 90% and serious assaults jumped 69%. As The Post reported, a student caught with seven bags of marijuana was given a warning note. It was up to him whether to show it to his parents.

And the head of the city’s principals union complains bitterly of chaotic conditions in many of the schools.

Now comes word that de Blasio, hand-in-glove with the City Council, is preparing to visit the same pox on New York’s streets.

De Blasio and Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito say vigorous enforcement of so-called quality-of-life crimes is too burdensome on what the speaker terms “communities of color.”

So, the city means to effectively decriminalize low-level antisocial behavior — public urination, outdoor dope-smoking and drinking, turnstile jumping and so on — on the way to gutting the so-called broken-windows approach to safe streets.

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton seems to be on board with the new policy and this is perplexing: He was one of the early proponents of the broken-windows philosophy — when cops vigorously confront the seemingly small stuff, major crime takes care of itself — when he was Rudy Giuliani’s first top cop back in 1994. And he has been a strong supporter of it since going to work for de Blasio — once even placing himself publicly at odds with the mayor.

Historically, of course, broken windows worked. It vested responsibility for minor misdeeds with the offender — discouraging repetition and making it clear that more serious crimes won’t be tolerated either.

The welcome result: a precipitous two-decade decline in crime of all sorts; New York is now the safest big city in America — if not the world.

So why mess with success?

Politics, of course, and ideology. But the new leniency also seems to be part of a broader social trend — one that seeks to shield offenders from the consequences of their own actions, ostensibly as a matter of racial justice.

The theory is simple enough: Because behavior-related sanctions seem to be applied disproportionately to black and Hispanics, relative to whites, the sanctions themselves must be inherently unfair.

“We know that the system has been really rigged against communities of color,” says Mark-Viverito. “So the question has always been, what can we do to minimize unnecessary interaction with the criminal justice system?”

What this approach ignores, to be frank, is that most victims of crime in New York City belong to Mark-Viverito’s “communities of color” — just as black and Hispanic students suffer most from disruptions in the city’s 70%-plus black and Hispanic public-school system.
“In only two-plus years, Team de Blasio returned much of the school system to a state of rudderless pandemonium — where one kid can do a crime knowing some other kid will do the time.”

Nobody has ever been able to demonstration that the NYPD goes anywhere other than to where the crime is.

It’s certainly not the cops’ fault that crime is disproportionately concentrated in “communities of color.”

The numbers are daunting: New York City is approximately 53% black and Hispanic — yet in 2013 roughly 95% of those arrested in shootings were black and Hispanic.

As were, more to the point, 96% of the city’s shooting victims.

And that’s just shootings.

Nobody is claiming that crime is an exclusively minority enterprise in New York. And few seriously contend that policing anywhere is totally color-blind — and that certainly includes New York.

But it is also beyond dispute that the consequences of street crime — and classroom chaos — fall most heavily on the very same communities that de Blasio, Mark-Viverito and Farińa claim they are seeking to protect.

To back off on strict enforcement on the grounds that it has become ineffective is one thing.

But to ease up because such policies penalize perpetrators stands common sense on its head.

What about the real victims?

They’re black and brown, too.
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-24-2016, 06:58 AM
The Bobster's Avatar
The Bobster The Bobster is offline
Senior Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 66,704
Default Re: De Blasio in secret bid to be Dems’ 2016 pick

http://nypost.com/2016/01/24/de-blas...hrow-money-at/

De Blasio hasn’t met a problem he doesn’t want to throw money at
By Nicole Gelinas
January 24, 2016 | 6:00am

On Thursday, Mayor de Blasio said he’s really worried about a new economic crisis.

“I’m a lot more concerned than I was this time a year ago,” he told the press at his annual budget presentation. “We’re well past the average point at which a recovery” in the economy “turns back to a recession. That alone should concern us.”

The mayor is right to worry — but he’s also doing not much, too late, to help New York weather a downturn. Instead, he’s added billions in unnecessary spending — making cuts to services like police and libraries that much worse when the bad times do come.

De Blasio is good at diagnosing the risk. We’re “watch[ing] economic storm clouds gather across the globe,” he warned last week. “World stock markets have lost trillions of dollars . . . We’re seeing slow or negative growth in many of the world’s major economies.” But even without such signs, the mayor added, he wouldn’t be complacent: “New Yorkers know the economy can turn on us suddenly and without warning,” he said.

OK, then, consider yourself warned.

The problem is, though, that it’s already too late for the mayor to be prudent with our money.

Consider the mayor’s actions over the past two years. During Mayor Bloomberg’s last year, the city spent $54.7 billion of its taxpayers’ cash (plus distributed another $19.9 billion in federal and state money). But for the upcoming fiscal year, which starts in July, de Blasio proposes to spend $62.1 billion. That’s a 13.5% hike in spending — nearly seven times as fast than inflation.

What are we spending this new money — about $7.4 billion a year — on?

The biggest culprit is pay for city workers.

When Bloomberg left office, we were spending about $22.4 billion in worker salaries and wages. This upcoming year, we’ll spend $25.8 billion. That’s a $3.4 billion increase, or more than 15%.
We haven’t added that many people.

Rather, we’re spending more on the people we have, thanks to the raises de Blasio gave to the city in his first few months in office. Those raises include back pay, for work done as far back as 2009.

The extra pay will cost us at least $17.8 billion — and we’ve got to pay some of it each year until we’re done, around four years from now.

The mayor’s argument at the time was that Bloomberg had been irresponsible in letting city workers go without raises for so long — and that he had no choice but to give them back pay.

But Bloomberg was correct not to give out raises in 2009 and in the following few years. The city was running a deficit then, and had to use up all of its savings just to pay existing salaries.

We need today’s surpluses to rebuild those savings — but we aren’t doing that.

We have about $4.9 billion in savings now, compared to $7 billion back in 2008. And we needed all that $7 billion, and more, to weather the recession.

Remember, Wall Street still provides us with nearly 8% of our annual tax revenues — or about $4.1 billion a year. In a long slump — one where we don’t get bailed out by Washington again — the losses here will use up our $4.9 billion in reserves fast.

As the mayor said last week, the hit on the budget from the last recession was $12.5 billion.

Sure, that recession was extraordinary — in how much money the feds gave our main industry as compared to the rest of the country’s employers, because they thought they needed to save the banks first.

It would be one thing if other types of spending were going down. But they’re not.

Starting this year, de Blasio is hiking the minimum wage for all city employees and outside contract workers to $15 — costing another $115 million annually.

One of the reasons we can’t afford these raises is that we have to pay pensions.

It would be lovely if we could afford for our police to retire after 22 years on half their salaries, including overtime, but we really can’t.

Annual pensions will cost us $9.4 billion this year — $1.1 billion more than they did when Bloomberg left. We’ll spend $9.8 billion next year, too, on health care for city workers and retirees — up from $8.9 billion when Bloomberg left, despite de Blasio’s pledge to save money there.

That is a lot of money.

Ironically, the mayor’s latest budget is not so big-spending.

He doesn’t offer much in the way of new programs: $12.5 million to build new housing for the mentally ill, $5.3 million on better park security, $8 million fixing up homeless shelters, and the like.

But a million here, a million there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money. Just last week, de Blasio “fixed” the nonexistent horse carriage problem by saying the city would pay for new stables in the park. Cost: Who knows? Maybe $25 million.

The mayor has a bad habit at throwing money at every constituency, without finding out first if we can just do things better.
“The problem is, though, that it’s already too late for the mayor to be prudent with our money.”

This while he’s actually cutting summer activities for schoolkids.

And despite de Blasio’s pledge to give $1.8 more money to the MTA for things like the next few stops on the Second Avenue Subway, his new budget doesn’t do that.

The reason for this miserliness, though, is ominous. Already, the big-spending mayor has spent so much that he can’t afford to spend more.

And that’s during the good times. What happens if — or, if you believe the mayor, when — things go wrong?
__________________
Those who find the truth hateful just hate hearing the truth.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.....on a nigger.

If you're not catching flak, you're not over the target.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.