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Old 01-18-2020, 09:38 AM
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Default ‘Brick Man’ is NYC’s newest bail-reform poster boy Negro

https://nypost.com/2020/01/17/brick-...rm-poster-boy/

‘Brick Man’ is NYC’s newest bail-reform poster boy
By Larry Celona, Andrew Denney and Bruce Golding
January 17, 2020 | 9:16pm

There’s another bail-reform poster boy in town — and cops call him the Brick Man!

Ex-con Anthony Manson, who earned his nickname by allegedly using a brick in smash-and-grabs, has been busted three times in a recent string of burglaries across Brooklyn and Manhattan — and released each time, The Post has learned.

Manson, 50, was arrested Dec. 23 for three burglaries in Brooklyn earlier that month — and got a Christmas gift courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s new bail law when he was released Dec. 25.

Manson is suspected of then committing two burglaries in Brooklyn that same day, sources said.

He was busted again Jan. 3 for two more break-ins committed Jan. 2 and 3, records show.

Cops also suspect him of eight other burglaries in Brooklyn, sources said.

At Manson’s Jan. 4 arraignment, prosecutors cited his Dec. 23 arrest in seeking to have him held on $15,000 bail, but he was instead freed on supervised release, according to the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office.

A controversial new state law bars judges from setting bail for defendants accused of non-violent felonies.

Manson went on to get arrested yet again in Manhattan on Wednesday, where cops spotted him smashing to door to the Center Stage Optique eyewear store in Greenwich Village around 2 a.m., authorities said.
see also
Cuomo again supports change to new bail law, but gives no specifics

He was caught inside the story carrying a suitcase that held $3,995 worth of sunglasses and a rock, according to court papers.

Manson was arraigned Thursday and released without bail yet again, even though sources said he’s under investigation for at least six other similar burglaries in Manhattan.

The career criminal’s rap sheet shows 67 arrests dating to 1991, sources said, and state records show he’s done two stints in prison, for robbery and selling drugs, respectively.

Manson told cops he lives in the Bronx, sources said, but neighbors at the address he provided said they’d never seen him there.

A Brooklyn detective said the situation “really pisses me off.”

“Besides feeling sorry for the victims, I feel sorry for the lawyers. Criminals don’t even need them anymore,” the source said.

A spokesman for the Legal Aid Society, which is representing Manson in Brooklyn, said, “What this case does underscore is the absence of critically needed services in our city and the resulting failure to meet the needs of so many of our clients and other New Yorkers.”
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Old 01-23-2020, 08:31 AM
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Default Re: ‘Brick Man’ is NYC’s newest bail-reform poster boy

https://nypost.com/2020/01/22/brick-...r-latest-bust/

‘Brick Man’ burglar charged for two more break-ins day after latest bust
By Larry Celona, Anabel Sosa and Natalie Musumeci
January 22, 2020 | 6:33pm | Updated


Anthony Manson has been arrested for another string of burglaries. DCPI


The “Brick Man” burglar, who has come to symbolize the failure of state bail reform because he keeps getting cut loose only to be arrested again, was busted in three more burglaries on Wednesday, sources said.

Ex-con Anthony Manson — who earned his nickname because he allegedly uses masonry to aid his smash-and-grabs — was arrested Wednesday and charged with breaking into a construction site in Brooklyn’s Prospect-Lefferts Gardens section the previous day, according to sources.

“I was trying to steal something to sell for some food,” Manson told cops upon his arrest at the site on New York Avenue near Lenox Road as he gave officers the bogus name of “William McKoy” and lied that he was 60 years old, sources said.

Manson was rummaging through boxes at the construction site and smashed a glass door there with an unknown object during the 1 a.m. break-in, the sources said.

He was hit with one count of burglary and false impersonation, authorities said.

While in custody, cops also linked him to two back-to-back Brooklyn burglaries in Boerum Hill on Jan. 14, authorities said.

Manson allegedly chucked a brick at an apartment building on Dean Street near Third Avenue and stole packages from the lobby at 4:40 p.m., police said.

Just 10 minutes later, the ex-con made his way down the block and allegedly busted his way into a residential building using a rock, authorities said.

He was hit with charges of burglary, criminal mischief, petit larceny and criminal possession of property in the Boerum Hill incidents.

Manson has been called a poster boy for the state’s new law that prevents judges from assigning bail for most misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies — because he is accused of committing six burglaries since his no-bail release on Dec. 23 in a trio of break-ins.

Two days before Christmas, Manson was busted for three burglaries he allegedly committed in Brooklyn earlier that month — and was promptly released on Christmas Day thanks to the new law, which passed in April and was observed by some courts as early as October before it formally took effect Jan. 1.

Manson was arrested on Jan. 3 in two more break-ins, on Jan. 2 and Jan. 3. Prosecutors sought to have him held on $15,000 bail during his Jan. 4 arraignment, but he was instead freed on supervised release.

Early on Jan. 15, Manson was again collared when police spotted him smashing the door to the Center Stage Optique eyewear store in Greenwich Village, according to court papers.

Cops caught him inside the store with a suitcase stuffed with $3,995 worth of sunglasses and a rock, court papers said.

He was arraigned the next day, but cut loose without bail — despite being under investigation for six similar burglaries in Manhattan at that point.

According to law-enforcement sources, Manson has 75 arrests on his record dating back to 1991. State records also show he has done two stints in prison — for robbery and selling drugs.

The accused serial burglar was in police custody at Kings County Hospital for a psych evaluation after his Wednesday arrest, according to a Brooklyn Criminal Court clerk.
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  #3  
Old 04-09-2020, 05:45 PM
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Default Re: ‘Brick Man’ is NYC’s newest bail-reform poster boy

https://nypost.com/2020/04/09/accuse...d-coronavirus/

Accused NYC serial burglar ‘Brick Man’ released from jail after coronavirus concerns
By Andrew Denney
April 9, 2020 | 8:39pm

The “Brick Man” is out of jail again — but this time he has the coronavirus to thank for his freedom.

Anthony Manson — a 50-year-old ex-con who earned his nickname by allegedly using the construction material for multiple smash-and-grab burglaries — was released this week with the consent of the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, The Post has learned.

Manson became a poster boy for the state’s controversial bail reform laws — after being repeatedly cut loose following arrests for alleged burglaries — before he was finally held on bail in January over the back-to-back arrests.

The DA’s office confirmed that Manson was released Tuesday after an attorney from the Legal Aid Society argued that he is at risk for catching COVID-19 at Rikers Island.

“Per the city’s Correctional Health Services, Mr. Manson is in the highest risk group if he contracted COVID-19 due to his age and health illness,” a Legal Aid spokesman told The Post.

“New Yorkers who are accused of crimes and seriously ill should not face a death sentence at Rikers Island before a jury has even had a chance to judge their guilt or innocence, regardless of what they are accused of.”

Before the pandemic broke, Manson earned headlines for his repeat trips through New York’s revolving door of justice amid new laws that stopped judges setting bail on most non-violent offenders.

The NYPD collared Manson in Dec. 23 for allegedly committing three burglaries and he was released on Dec. 25.

Manson was busted again Jan. 3 for two more alleged break-ins committed Jan. 2 and 3, records show.

Cops also suspect him of eight other burglaries in Brooklyn, sources said.

At Manson’s Jan. 4 arraignment, prosecutors cited his Dec. 23 arrest in seeking to have him held on $15,000 bail — but he was instead freed on supervised release.

Manson went on to get arrested yet again in Manhattan on Jan. 15 after cops spotted him smashing through the door to a Greenwich Village eyewear store around 2 a.m., authorities said.

Then on Jan. 22, police allegedly found Manson at it again — this time rummaging through a Prospect Lefferts Gardens construction site — and a judge finally set bail.

The city Department of Correction reported on Thursday that 288 inmates and 488 staff members have tested positive for the coronavirus.

The DOC does not provide information on which of its facilities they are from, but the vast majority of its inmates are held at Rikers.

Since the virus outbreak, the city has released hundreds of inmates from Rikers and its other lockups.

As of Thursday, the city had fewer than 4,300 prisoners in custody, down from more than 5,000 just weeks ago.

Brooklyn DA spokesman Oren Yaniv said that Manson was placed on supervised release and that the city, prosecutors and the DOC are working together to “release as many people as possible during the health crisis.”

“Conditions in Rikers and the inability to socially distance inside the jail make this a life-or-death situation,” he said.

“This defendant — who we will continue to prosecute for his alleged crimes — has health conditions that make him particularly vulnerable to serious or possibly life-threatening illness. The city agreed to put him on supervised release and several organizations provided him with supportive housing and other services as conditions of his release.”
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  #4  
Old 04-09-2020, 08:13 PM
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Default Re: ‘Brick Man’ is NYC’s newest bail-reform poster boy

Accused NYC serial burglar released again and again and again thanks to new bail law
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