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sniffy
08-02-2017, 08:25 AM
These (transgender) words are at the vanguard of a post-modern, radical leftist ideology that I detest, and which is, in my professional opinion, frighteningly similar to the Marxist doctrines that killed at least 100 million people in the 20th century.

Jordan Peterson

https://twt-thumbs.washtimes.com/media/image/2017/08/01/Jordan_B_Peterson_c0-0-640-373_s885x516.jpg?ba6c66ab8cdb5e6ea399b5fe08ee3ac37 1a2ff75

Jordan B. Peterson’s YouTube account locked during biblical lecture series: ‘No explanation

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/aug/1/jordan-b-petersons-youtube-account-locked-during-b/

By Douglas Ernst - The Washington Times - Tuesday, August 1, 2017
The University’s of Toronto’s Dr. Jordan B. Peterson turned to famous friends Tuesday after his YouTube account was locked “with no explanation.”
The clinical psychologist who shot to fame in 2016 for opposition to Canada’s “C-16 bill” — critics called him “transphobic” for his refusal to use genderless pronouns — said Google is refusing give him access to his YouTube account. The timing coincides with attempts to upload a new installment of his biblical lecture series, which has garnered over 1 million views.
“Google is refusing to reinstate my account. Violation of terms of service. No explanation given,” he began a series of tweets. “@joerogan @RubinReport @scrowder @SamHarrisOrg I’ve been locked out of YouTube & my personal account: violation of terms of service. I cannot post new YouTube videos, including last week’s Biblical lecture. No access. At least — for now — the videos are still up.”
Mr. Peterson’s appearances on podcast star Joe Rogan’s channel, along with Dave Rubin of “The Rubin Report” and Steven Crowder’s “Louder with Crowder,” have also tallied millions of views.
Mr. Rogan immediately shared the news with his 3.45 million followers and Mr. Rubin demanded YouTube “fix this ASAP.”
The professor, who often speaks on the dangers of moral relativism, has a loyal following — particularly among young men — who cheer his calls to embrace personal responsibility, virtue and truth.

sniffy
08-02-2017, 10:50 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jordan_Peterson

Bill C-16 controversy

On September 27, 2016, Peterson released the first installment of a three-part lecture video series, entitled "Professor against political correctness: Part I: Fear and the Law".[8][14] In the video, he stated he would not use the preferred gender pronouns of students and faculty, and announced his objection to the Canadian government's Bill C-16, which proposed to add "gender identity or expression" as a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act, as well to the list of identifiable groups against whom it is illegal under the Criminal Code to promote genocide or publicly incite hatred.[15]

He stated that his objection to the bill was based on potential free speech implications if the criminal code is amended, as he claimed he could then be prosecuted under provincial human rights laws if he refuses to call a transsexual student or faculty member by their preferred pronoun.[16] Furthermore, he argued that the new amendments paired with section 46.3 of the Ontario Human Rights Code would make it possible for employers and organizations to be subject to punishment under the code if any employee or associate says anything that can be construed "directly or indirectly" as offensive, "whether intentionally or unintentionally."[17] Other academics challenged Peterson's interpretation of C-16.[16]

The series of videos drew criticism from transgender activists, faculty and labour unions, and critics accused Peterson of "helping to foster a climate for hate to thrive".[8] Protests erupted on campus, some including violence, and the controversy attracted international media attention.[18][19] When asked in September 2016 if he would comply with the request of a student to use a preferred pronoun, Peterson said "it would depend on how they asked me ... If I could detect that there was a chip on their shoulder, or that they were [asking me] with political motives, then I would probably say no ... If I could have a conversation like the one we're having now, I could probably meet them on an equal level."[20] Two months later, the National Post published an op-ed by Peterson in which he elaborated on his opposition to the bill and explained why he publicly made a stand against it:

I will never use words I hate, like the trendy and artificially constructed words "zhe" and "zher." These words are at the vanguard of a post-modern, radical leftist ideology that I detest, and which is, in my professional opinion, frighteningly similar to the Marxist doctrines that killed at least 100 million people in the 20th century.

I have been studying authoritarianism on the right and the left for 35 years. I wrote a book, Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief, on the topic, which explores how ideologies hijack language and belief. As a result of my studies, I have come to believe that Marxism is a murderous ideology. I believe its practitioners in modern universities should be ashamed of themselves for continuing to promote such vicious, untenable and anti-human ideas, and for indoctrinating their students with these beliefs. I am therefore not going to mouth Marxist words. That would make me a puppet of the radical left, and that is not going to happen. Period.[21]

In response to the controversy, the HR department of the University of Toronto sent Peterson two letters of warning, one noting that free speech had to be made in accordance with human rights legislation and the other adding that his refusal to use the preferred personal pronouns of students and faculty upon request could constitute discrimination. Peterson speculated that these warning letters were leading up to formal disciplinary action against him, but in December the university assured him that he would retain his professorship, and in January 2017 he returned to teach his psychology class at the University of Toronto.[8]

In February 2017, Maxime Bernier, candidate for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, stated that he shifted his position on Bill C-16 after meeting with Peterson and discussing it.[22] Peterson's analysis of the bill was also frequently cited by senators who were opposed to its passage.[23]

In May, Peterson spoke against Bill C-16 at a senate committee on legal and constitutional affairs hearing. He was one of 24 witnesses who were invited to speak on the bill.[23]